Author(s): Kavita Sekhri, Sangeeta Bhanwra, Ruchika Nandha, Suruchi Aditya, Deepak Bhasin

Email(s): message2kavita@yahoo.com

DOI: 10.52711/2321-5836.2022.00019   

Address: Kavita Sekhri*1, Sangeeta Bhanwra2, Ruchika Nandha3, Suruchi Aditya4, Deepak Bhasin5
1Assistant Professor, Deptt. of Pharmacology, Dr Harvansh Singh Judge Institute of Dental Sciences, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.
2Professor, Deptt. of Pharmacology, Govt. Medical College and Hospital, Sector 32, Chandigarh, India.
3Assistant Professor, Deptt. of Pharmacology, Dr Harvansh Singh Judge Institute of Dental Sciences, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.
4Assistant Professor, Deptt. of Pharmacology, Dr Harvansh Singh Judge Institute of Dental Sciences, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India.
5Deptt. of Critical Care, Max Superspeciality Hospital, Mohali (Punjab), India.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 14,      Issue - 2,     Year - 2022


ABSTRACT:
Chloroquine was discovered in 1934 and since then it is used as an antimalarial drug saving millions of lives. Chloroquine and its analogue Hydroxychloroquine possess pleotropic pharmacological actions and are of proven value in multiple conditions ranging from protozoal to autoimmune diseases. Advantage with these drugs is their well-documented tolerability profile. In Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Corona virus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), these drugs in vitro showed promising results working at multiple sites ranging from prevention of entry of the virus into human cells, halting the multiplication by altering the pH of internal organelles towards basic side and via exocytosis. These drugs also act as immunomodulators to prevent flare up of cytokines and interleukin cascade, thus preventing multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. In this review we trend the journey of these drugs, how high hopes were pinned to their use but they failed to show any mortality benefit in hospitalized patients. However, still certain studies are underway to explore their role in prophylaxis or otherwise. Medline, Medscape, EMBASE, Cochrane database, Scopus and clinicaltrials.gov were searched using terms like “SARS-CoV-2”, “COVID-19”, “Chloroquine” and “Hydroxychloroquine”.


Cite this article:
Kavita Sekhri, Sangeeta Bhanwra, Ruchika Nandha, Suruchi Aditya, Deepak Bhasin. Journey of Chloroquine/ Hydroxychloroquine in the management of COVID-19. Research Journal of Pharmacology and Pharmacodynamics.2022;14(2):110-6. doi: 10.52711/2321-5836.2022.00019

Cite(Electronic):
Kavita Sekhri, Sangeeta Bhanwra, Ruchika Nandha, Suruchi Aditya, Deepak Bhasin. Journey of Chloroquine/ Hydroxychloroquine in the management of COVID-19. Research Journal of Pharmacology and Pharmacodynamics.2022;14(2):110-6. doi: 10.52711/2321-5836.2022.00019   Available on: https://rjppd.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2022-14-2-10


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