Author(s): Tin Moe Nwe, San San Aye, Khin Than Yee, Soe Lwin, Vidya Bhagat

Email(s): 55vidya42@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/2321-5836.2021.00021   

Address: Tin Moe Nwe1, San San Aye2, Khin Than Yee3, Soe Lwin4, Vidya Bhagat5
1Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UNIMAS.
2Unimas Health Center, UNIMAS.
3Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UNIMAS.
4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UNIMAS,
5Institute of Hospital Administration, Rajiv Gandhi Medical University, A.J Hospital and Research Center, Mangalore India.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 13,      Issue - 3,     Year - 2021


ABSTRACT:
Adolescence is a critical stage of the developmental trajectory, where a child’s transition to independent living may result in healthy or unhealthy styles. During this period, it is easier to mend an individual as a healthy adult; at the same time, misguided children may enter into risky behaviors. The aim of the study to get an insight into changing brains of adolescents and their behavioral outcomes. The current review search engine proceeds with reviewing the literature in the past through electronic databases such as PubMed, Medline, and Scopus databases using keywords such as adolescent stage, the brain of teenagers, risk behaviors, reduction in gray matter in the prefrontal cortex. The current study reviewed and analyzed 20 articles. The reviewed articles would increase the awareness and insights regarding brain changes and their behavioral outcomes. This insightful information’s drawn out of the study may help professionals and parents who intervene the adolescent’s problem behaviors.


Cite this article:
Tin Moe Nwe, San San Aye, Khin Than Yee, Soe Lwin, Vidya Bhagat. Remodeling in the Prefrontal Cortex of a Brain-related to Higher Executive Functions in Adolescence: Its effects on Behavior. Research Journal of Pharmacology and Pharmacodynamics. 2021; 13(3): 99-102. doi: 10.52711/2321-5836.2021.00021

Cite(Electronic):
Tin Moe Nwe, San San Aye, Khin Than Yee, Soe Lwin, Vidya Bhagat. Remodeling in the Prefrontal Cortex of a Brain-related to Higher Executive Functions in Adolescence: Its effects on Behavior. Research Journal of Pharmacology and Pharmacodynamics. 2021; 13(3): 99-102. doi: 10.52711/2321-5836.2021.00021   Available on: https://rjppd.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2021-13-3-5


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