Author(s): Ganesh G. Dhakad, Bhagyashri O. Fate, Amruta R. Pandav, Abhijit V. Shrirao, N. I. Kochar, A. V. Chandewar

Email(s): ganeshdhakad552@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/2321-5836.2023.00016   

Address: Ganesh G. Dhakad, Bhagyashri O. Fate, Amruta R. Pandav, Abhijit V. Shrirao, N. I. Kochar, A. V. Chandewar
PataldhamalWadhwani College of Pharmacy, Yavatmal.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 15,      Issue - 2,     Year - 2023


ABSTRACT:
Stem cells have the ability to differentiate into specific cell types. The two defining characteristics of a stem cell are perpetual self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into a specialized adult cell type. There are two major classes of stem cells: pluripotent that can become any cell in the adult body, and multipotent that are restricted to becoming a more limited population of cells. Cell sources, characteristics, differentiation and therapeutic applications are discussed. Stem cells have great potential in tissue regeneration and repair but much still needs to be learned about their biology, manipulation and safety before their full therapeutic potential can be achieved.


Cite this article:
Ganesh G. Dhakad, Bhagyashri O. Fate, Amruta R. Pandav, Abhijit V. Shrirao, N. I. Kochar, A. V. Chandewar. Review on Stem Cell Therapy and its Various Aspects. Research Journal of Pharmacology and Pharmacodynamics.2023;15(2):77-6. doi: 10.52711/2321-5836.2023.00016

Cite(Electronic):
Ganesh G. Dhakad, Bhagyashri O. Fate, Amruta R. Pandav, Abhijit V. Shrirao, N. I. Kochar, A. V. Chandewar. Review on Stem Cell Therapy and its Various Aspects. Research Journal of Pharmacology and Pharmacodynamics.2023;15(2):77-6. doi: 10.52711/2321-5836.2023.00016   Available on: https://rjppd.org/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2023-15-2-8


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